Lake Erie Conservative

thoughtful discussion(s) about issue(s)

Posts Tagged ‘Hosni Mubarak’

… Egypt should Ban the Muslim Brotherhood …

Posted by paulfromwloh on Saturday,August 17th,2013

.. what did you expect ?

.. the Brotherhood is a criminal organization . As has been said , it is dedicated to the imposition of sharia law , and its own form of Islamic dictatorship . Naturally , it means that the MB would be in control of the country . But from where ? Cairo , or Teheran ?

.. Considering the history of the Brotherhood , I would think that they would take their marching orders from the mullahs in Iran . It would make the world and especially the Middle East , in particular , a far more dangerous place . Israel itself , would be in the cross – hairs .

.. Egypt is currently a U.S. ally . The way that the ObamaCraps are pissing on the Egyptians , that is very likely to change , even if the Egyptian military (which is an important political power base in its own right) remains in power . They may not feel that the alliance with the U.S. is worth it all that much anymore , and dump us . Picking up someone else would be tricky , though .

Egypt considers outlawing Muslim Brotherhood

CAIRO (AP) – Egyptian authorities are considering disbanding the Muslim Brotherhood group, a government spokesman said Saturday, once again outlawing a group that held the pinnacle of government power just more than a month earlier.

The announcement comes after security forces broke up two sit-in protests this week by those calling for the reinstatement of President Mohammed Morsi, a Brotherhood leader deposed in a July 3 coup. The clashes killed more than 600 people that day and sparked protests and violence that killed 173 people Friday alone.

Cabinet spokesman Sherif Shawki said that Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi, who leads the military-backed government, assigned the Ministry of Social Solidarity to study the legal possibilities of dissolving the group. He didn’t elaborate.

The Muslim Brotherhood group, founded in 1928, came to power a year ago when its Morsi was elected in the country’s first free presidential elections. The election came after the overthrow of autocrat Hosni Mubarak in a popular uprising in 2011.

(AP) Egyptians security forces provide a cordon around the al-Fatah mosque, after hundreds of Muslim…
Full Image

The fundamentalist group has been banned for most of its 80-year history and repeatedly subjected to crackdowns under Mubarak’s rule. While sometimes tolerated and its leaders part of the political process, members regularly faced long bouts of imprisonment and arbitrary detentions.

Since Morsi was deposed in the popularly backed military coup, the Brotherhood stepped up its confrontation with the new leadership, holding sit-ins in two encampments for weeks, rallying thousands and vowing not to leave until Morsi is reinstated.

On Wednesday, security authorities swept through the two protest camps, leaving hundreds killed and thousands others injured. The violent crackdown sparked days of street violence across the country where Islamist supporters stormed and torched churches and police stations.

In the most recent standoff, Egyptian security forces exchanged heavy gunfire Saturday with armed men at top of a minaret of a Cairo mosque. The security forces fired tear gas, stormed the mosque and rounded up hundreds of Islamists supporters of Morsi who had been barricaded inside overnight.

The confrontations Friday – around a Brotherhood call for a “Day of Rage” – killed at least 173 people, said Shawki, the Cabinet spokesman. He said 1,330 people were wounded in the protests.

Egypt’s Interior Ministry said in a statement that a total of 1,004 Brotherhood members were detained in raids across the country and that weapons, bombs and ammunition were confiscated with the detainees.

Among the dead Friday was Ammar Badie, a son of Brotherhood spiritual leader Mohammed Badie, the group’s political arm said in a statement.

Also Saturday, authorities arrested the brother of al-Qaida chief Ayman al-Zawahri, a security official said Saturday. Mohammed al-Zawahri, leader of the ultraconservative Jihadi Salafist group, was detained at a checkpoint in Giza, the city across the Nile from Cairo, the official said.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity as he wasn’t authorized to brief journalists about the arrest.

Advertisements

Posted in national security, personal opinion | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

… Egyptian Christians Targeted [What Else is New , Unfortunately] …

Posted by paulfromwloh on Saturday,July 13th,2013

.. The aftermath of the removal of Mohammed Morsi from power is taking ominous turns :

.. The military’s ouster of President Mohamed Morsi has unleashed a new wave of violence by extremist Muslims against Christians whom they blame for having supported the calls to overthrow Mr. Morsi, Egypt’s first Islamist elected leader, according to rights activists.

.. Since Mr. Morsi’s ouster on July 3rd , the activists say, a priest has been shot dead in the street, Islamists have painted black X’s on Christian shops to mark them for arson and angry mobs have attacked churches and besieged Christians in their homes. Four Christians were reported slaughtered with knives and machetes in one village last week.

.. The attacks have hit across the country , in the northern Sinai Peninsula, in a resort town on the Mediterranean coast, in Port Said along the Suez Canal and in isolated villages in upper Egypt.

.. Tensions between the Christian minority and extremist elements in the Muslim majority are not new, but many cite anger among Islamists at the removal of Mr. Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood from power as fueling the recent increase in violence.

.. Many Christians were alarmed at the victories of Islamists in elections after the 2011 revolution that overthrew Mr. Morsi’s autocratic predecessor, Hosni Mubarak. Although Christians by no means represented a majority of the anti-Morsi rallies that preceded Mr. Morsi’s downfall, Christians did participate in the campaigns to remove Mr. Morsi that so deeply antagonized his supporters.

..  “They thought Christians played a big role in the protests and in the army’s intervention to topple Morsi, so this is revenge for that,” said Ishaq Ibrahim, who has documented the violence for the Cairo-based Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, or EIPR.

.. Many Islamist leaders blamed Christians and holdovers from the Mubarak era for the mass protests against Mr. Morsi that took place on the June 30 anniversary of his swearing-in. Even rank-and-file Islamists maintaining a sit-in in a Cairo suburb calling for Mr. Morsi’s return often have spoken spitefully of what they described as Christian collusion.

.. In some places, Christians were admonished not to participate in the anti-Morsi protests. Fliers distributed in the upper Egypt province of Minya, documented by EIPR, warned that “one liter of gas can light up your gold, wood, plumbing, tractor, carpentry shops, buses, cars, houses, churches, schools, agricultural fields and workshops.”

.. They were signed “people who care for the country.”

.. If the aftermath of this coup turns into sectarian violence, then Egypt may find itself heading down a path that will be bad not only for its own future, but for the future of the entire region.

Posted in personal opinion | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »